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#askBBFC Twitter Q & A Transcript – Tuesday 29 April

On Tuesday 29 April, we held the answer session for our classifying imitable techniques Twitter Q & A. The Q & A was designed to coincide with the theme of our latest podcast (episode 20) about classifying self-harm.

Date 29/04/2014

The previous week we asked our followers to tweet us their questions about classifying imitable techniques, using the #askBBFC hashtag.
The answer session took the most interesting questions and answered them during a 30 minute session. If you missed this, the transcript of questions and answers follows below.

We aim to hold a twitter Q and A once a month and we’ll give plenty notice about when we’re collecting questions, whether there is a specific theme and when the answer session will take place. We use this format to ensure that any questions that require detailed answers can be researched if required and formulated into as few tweets as possible.

You can send longer questions you have to us at any time, by emailing us.

‏@BBFC
In our #askbbfc Q&A today we'll begin by explaining what we mean by the term 'imitable techniques' and then answer a few of your questions

@BBFC
NeilYoung & CigaretteBurns ask what are "imitable techniques"? #askBBFC

@BBFC
We explain imitable techniques on p.5 of the Classification Guidelines #askBBFC

@BBFC
#askBBFC imitable techniques include dangerous & illegal behaviour & self harm

@BBFC
#askBBFC imitable techniques can be an issue at every age category

@BBFC
#askBBFC at the lower categories of U or PG, it might be dangerous behaviour a child could copy

@BBFC
#askBBFC themes like suicide are more likely to be classified 12A/12 or higher

@BBFC
#askBBFC instructional detail that could cause harm to anyone copying it may also be cut at the adult level

@BBFC
Mayhemfilmfestival asks: How does the BBFC define and measure 'harm'? #askBBFC

@BBFC
#askBBFC we publish how we define harm on p.3 of the Classification Guidelines

@BBFC
#askBBFC research & expert opinion on issues of harm can be inconclusive or contradictory so we must rely on our own experience & expertise

‏@BBFC
#askBBFC We consider whether the material on its own, or in combination with other similar content, may cause any harm

@BBFC
#askBBFC This includes not just any harm that may result from the behaviour of potential  viewers but also any moral harm that may be caused

@BBFC
#askBBFC moral harm could be desensitising a potential viewer to the effects of violence or degrading their sense of empathy

@BBFC
#askBBFC with regard to children, harm may include retarding social and moral development, and distorting sense of right and wrong

@BBFC
Ronandusty asks: Why did BBFC used to be strict on depictions of headbutts but now the likes of Captain America 2 is full of them? #askBBFC

@BBFC
BBFCinsight for Captain America: Winter Soldier mentions violence in the film, but there is no focus on blood or visible injury #askBBFC

@BBFC
Find the BBFCinsight here #askbbfc

@BBFC
Prior to the Guidelines Consultation exercises established in 1998, there was concern about headbutts #askBBFC

@BBFC
Some films were cut to remove headbutts in order to achieve a lower classification #askBBFC

@BBFC
Recent research & public consultations have shown headbutts as a violent act can be classified much the same as other violent blows #askBBFC

@BBFC
They are classified on the strength of the violence, and not only because of the technique itself #askBBFC

@BBFC
Nevertheless even at 12A/12 now, violence should not dwell on detail and there should be no emphasis on injuries or blood #askBBFC

@BBFC
That's all we have time for today, thank you to everyone submitting #askbbfc questions about classifying imitable techniques

@BBFC
You can listen to our podcast about classifying imitable techniques, in particular self-harm  #askbbfc

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