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#askBBFC Twitter Q & A Transcript – Thursday 03 April

On Thursday 3 April, we held the answer session for our ‘classifying horror’ Twitter Q & A.

Date 04/04/2014

Earlier in the week we asked our followers to tweet us their questions about classifying scenes of horror or specific horror films, using the #askBBFC hashtag.

The answer session took the most interesting questions and answered them during a 30 minute session. If you missed this, the transcript of questions and answers follows below.

We aim to hold a twitter Q and A once a month and we’ll give plenty notice about when we’re collecting questions, whether there is a specific theme and when the answer session will take place. We use this format to ensure that any questions that require detailed answers can be researched if required and formulated into as few tweets as possible.

You can send longer questions you have to us at any time, by emailing us.

@BBFC
We've been asking you to send us your #askBBFC questions about classifying horror...

BBFC
We’ll start the #askBBFC answers session today with a question from Anthony Stenhouse

@BBFC
He asks: in respect of the original cut of EvilDead do you think you would have requested cuts like the MPAA before classifying 18? #askBBFC

‏@BBFC 
We classified the 'extended' version of THE EVIL DEAD remake 18 uncut for DVD and Blu-Ray release #askBBFC

‏@BBFC
We believe this version contains material that was cut for an R in the US #askBBFC

@BBFC
Next up we have an #askBBFC question about a historic BBFC rating

@BBFC
Guy Osborn asks: have you considered reviving the 'H' certificate? #askBBFC

‏@BBFC
#askBBFC the H certificate pre-dated the 12, 15 and 18 ratings we have today

‏@BBFC
#askBBFC although we like the old H, horror can be classified across the categories & we use BBFCinsight to flag horror in a film

@BBFC
#askBBFC Adam Silke asks about context vs blood and gore when classifying horror…

@BBFC
#askBBFC shouldn't film classification especially #horror use common sense in using storyline as well as the amount of blood and gore?

@BBFC
When classifying horror we take into account tone and context as well as blood and gore #askBBFC

‏@BBFC
Gore might have less impact if the context is fantastical for example #askBBFC

@BBFC
In our Guidelines research, the public told us what level of detail they think is acceptable for gory scenes at each age rating #askBBFC

‏@BBFC
So at 12A there should be no emphasis on injuries or blood but occasional gory moments may be permitted if justified by the context #askBBFC

@BBFC
Parents are just as concerned about psychological threat as they are about gore #askBBFC

@BBFC
You can read about this on page 88 and 92 of the Guidelines research #askBBFC

‏@BBFC
Ronandusty wants to know about the 18 rating for Halloween (1978) #askBBFC

@BBFC
Why is the original Halloween still certified 18? I’ve seen 12 cert films more graphic #askbbfc

@BBFC
Halloween (1978) was classified again for cinema in 2012. You can see the BBFCinsight here 

@BBFC
When classifying an old film, we first consider whether the existing category is still reasonable #askBBFC

@BBFC
With Halloween, we decided the real-world setting combined with the sadism of certain moments, made an 18 still reasonable #askBBFC

@BBFC
Kevin Crighton asks whether how old a film is, impacts on the rating #askBBFC

‏@BBFC
#askBBFC when reclassifying horrors from 40/50 years ago, does the age of the film factor into deciding the new rating it receives?

@BBFC
Sometimes a film will lose its potency over the years, but this isn’t always the case #askBBFC

@BBFC
As we’ve discussed Halloween (1978) is still classified 18 #askBBFC

@BBFC
However, The Mummy (1959) was an X, but has been a PG since 1997 18 #askBBFC

@BBFC
Night of the Living Dead was an X in 1968, 18 in the 2000's, then a 15 from 2007 onwards #askBBFC

@BBFC
Alice Duggan asks about requesting cuts #askBBFC

@BBFC
When classifying body horror films (David Cronenberg/Tom Six) how do you decide what to ask them to edit? #askBBFC

@BBFC
This would depend on the issues in the film & the classification they company is looking to achieve #askBBFC

@BBFC
At 18 only unlawful or potentially harmful content is cut so these cuts would be quite specific #askBBFC

‏@BBFC
At lower categories, cuts to reduce impact or gore might be less specific #askBBFC

‏@BBFC
We don’t advise a company of how they should make a cut, we do highlight problematic scenes or elements #askBBFC

‏@BBFC
The company can then reduce these using whatever methods suit the film #askBBFC

@BBFC
We'll finish the #askBBFC session today on the topic of exempt content on horror video works

@BBFC
We’ve received a number of questions about changes to the VRA regarding exempt content #askBBFC

@BBFC
The proposed changes are here Page 5 of the 1st document sets out when content would be considered exempt #askBBFC

@BBFC
The consultation was carried out by DCMS #askBBFC

@BBFC
It was designed to consider whether content previously exempt which is unsuitable for younger children should be classified #askBBFC

@BBFC
Any distributors requiring guidance can contact us to set up a briefing on feedback@bbfc.co.uk #askBBFC

@BBFC
If you missed any part of the #askBBFC session today, we'll publish a transcript of the Q&A and the tweet the link

@BBFC
Thank you to everyone submitting #askBBFC questions this week!

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